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Eyegores Odditorium & Monster Museum By Sharon Black

When he left his sleep study tech job in Virginia during the pandemic and drove across the US, Matt Alford noticed something he had never seen before in Cawker City, Kansas. A huge ball of twine. Not a huge ball, but the world’s largest. He realized this was where he needed to be, and eventually bought a building north of the ball. He put into action what many travelers thought, there’s not even a place to stop for a bottle of pop.

Cawker City is not a large town at all. It is nestled among other towns and Waconda Lake.

Eyegores Odditorium & Monster Museum displays things one would see in the television hit show, The X Files. Any fan would be drooling at what is in it. He also sells souvenirs for the ball of twine, like a large lapel pin, Having a ball in Cawker City.

Matt feels that the town could become a tourist attraction with the many buildings available. The highway is busy through the town, and the majority of the buildings are limestone with a Victorian flare.

He would like to see the tourist industry grow for Cawker City, but not so much that it would lose its charm.

Matt donned an Elvis costume, and went to the ball and performed a wedding ceremony. That was probably a first for Cawker City.(More from Sharon…)


Sharon Black is from Smith Center, Kansas. We welcome her to our team of volunteers.

Sharon Black has been writing for many years including newspapers, short stories, and as a publisher. She was born in Nebraska and has lived in Kansas most of her life. In her hometown of Smith Center, Kansas,  Willa Cather’s hometown is to the north and Bob Dole’s hometown is to the south. Sharon is a press release writer for the National Parks Arts Foundation and writes for b U n e k e  magazine. The biggest project she has accomplished is the co-writer of the TV movie Home on the Range. The movie is about the song, which is the state song of Kansas and the lawsuit surrounding it in the 1930s and finding the rightful author of the song. Sharon is distantly related to the Mississippi writer Eudora Welty.